The weather was made to order in Cheltenham on the morning of 20 March 2015. The Sun rose into a blue, cloudless sky and started to appear over the Quad rooftops at about 8am. By the time the eclipse started half an hour later, the Physics department were ready with the Solar telescope out, metre long projection boxes constructed and several lens based devices up and running in order to be able to see such a rare spectacle safely.

The Moon crept across the Sun over the next hour spurring more and more pupils and staff to gather in the Quad to witness it. The temperature fell noticeably as the light faded and strangely people’s breath could easily be seen. Even the local crows became confused and seemed to want to roost. The atmosphere was further enhanced by the English Department who recited pagan chants from King Lear.

Perfect conditions allowed all to see the tiny crescent at maximum coverage – an awe inspiring site – and then slowly but surely the Moon and Sun parted company bringing back the sense of normality and the loss of the temporary ‘other worldliness’ that was felt.

The weather was made to order in Cheltenham on the morning of 20 March 2015. The Sun rose into a blue, cloudless sky and started to appear over the Quad rooftops at about 8am. By the time the eclipse started half an hour later, the Physics department were ready with the Solar telescope out, metre long projection boxes constructed and several lens based devices up and running in order to be able to see such a rare spectacle safely.

The Moon crept across the Sun over the next hour spurring more and more pupils and staff to gather in the Quad to witness it. The temperature fell noticeably as the light faded and strangely people’s breath could easily be seen. Even the local crows became confused and seemed to want to roost. The atmosphere was further enhanced by the English Department who recited pagan chants from King Lear.

Perfect conditions allowed all to see the tiny crescent at maximum coverage – an awe inspiring site – and then slowly but surely the Moon and Sun parted company bringing back the sense of normality and the loss of the temporary ‘other worldliness’ that was felt.